BOOK CLUB

For discussion of other games, TV, movies, books, etc.
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Celine en Chasteaux
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Celine en Chasteaux »

Thanks for the recommendations, all! Plenty to add to Goodreads :D
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Sophia Payne
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Sophia Payne »

I'll leave my humble addition...

The Asylum For Wayward Victorian Girls - Emilie Autumn

Listen to her music before AND AFTER reading and you'll understand a lot ♥
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Nakor Tsuruomo
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Nakor Tsuruomo »

Fantasy books:
1. The Witcher - best books I have ever read. Characters, humour. My favourite, read it few times(in Polish, not sure if it's good in Eng)
2. Game of Thrones - most complicated saga ever. So many characters.
3. Raymond Feist books - good fantasy to read, easy and fast.

Thriler:
1. Reacher - I just love everything by Lee Child. Books are repetitive, schematic but still they all are great.

Crime:
1. Michael Connelly - Bosch novels. Oh boy I love climate of his books. You can feel LA is sunny place with dark spots. TV show is very good as well!
2. Nele Neuhaus -Oliver/Pia crime novels.
3. Peter Robinson - Banks novels.
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Jacob Hodgson
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Jacob Hodgson »

I have been trying to tackle some of the literary classics....just finished 1984, heading into the Alchemist now (no I’m not in high school)
If anyone has heard of Easton Press, highly recommend checking them out, I ordered 20000 leagues under the sea from them and the book is beautiful.

For fantasy I’m going to read LOTR this winter, feels like time to re-read those classics.

Lots of good book suggestions above, I’ll look into those. My dad has finally got out of his Lee Child phase, I think he’s managed to read all of his books in large print..I’ll check those out because he absolutely loved them.

Thanks! :idea:
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Laura Karpinski
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Laura Karpinski »

I love literary classics, Jacob. If you haven't read them already I'd recommend everyone read the following at least once (you might be able to tell I love a good gothic novel):
  • Dracula - Forget the vampire crap you thought it was about and put aside your pre-conceptions. Its a stonking adventure novel which is actually quite an easy ready despite its age. A group of friends take on Dracula, including using real estate records cause hell yeah for badass lawyers.
  • Frankenstein - Pretty much every pop culture reference to Frankenstein involves a clumsy idiotic monster with his hands out and bits falling off him, which is really weird. Its a super well written book and the 'monster' is such a wonderful, nuanced and intelligent character.
  • The Picture of Dorian Grey - A hedonistic young man has this picture painted and sells his soul, so his beauty will never fade (like the picture). So he stays young and beautiful, but becomes corrupted and sinful. It caused quite a scandal when it was written, which makes me like it more.
  • The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner - This one is kind of hard going because the language is particularly old fashioned, but the story is good. A young religious fanatic makes a very persuasive friend who convinces him is it his job to rid the world of sinners. Its a good exploration of the mindset of the main character as he gets deeper and deeper into his cause. Its kind of like an early 19th century Death Note.
  • The Yellow Wallpaper - Its a short story, but I adore it and everyone should read it, if only just for the education. Its a feminist novel centering on a woman who has been confined to her bed for 'mild hysterical tendencies', and starts becoming obsessed with the wallpaper. You'll read it in a couple of hours max, but its creepy as hell and a fascinating insight into the medical treatment and status of women in the 19th century.
I would also recommend:
  • Temeraire series (His Master's Dragon in the US) - Probably my personal favourite series. Its set in the Napoleonic era and its a historical fiction, but with the twist that there are dragons, which in the UK at least form the military air support. Its got dramatic sea battles and strategy, but with the extra tactic of dragons. And the characters are beautifully written. Highly recommended.
  • Catch-22 - Arguably a literary classic. Its set in WW2 following a bombardier called Yossarian. The novel jumps around in time and place a lot, so it can be a bit hard going at first but I'd recommend you view them as separate 'scenes', because the chronological story starts to emerge as you read more and can start to put things together in your head. Its really funny and there are a few gut punches and twists in there. Its a book that I'm forever annoying my husband with, saying "So this happened... hold on.... no I need to go back a bit. So first this happened... Oh no, so there's this guy, right..."
  • Ella Minnow Pea - A short novel but really fun. The concept is a culture that basically worships the creator of the phrase "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs" (a sentence with every letter of the alphabet) with a mural of the phrase in their town center. Then a natural disaster means the mural is damaged and certain letters are destroyed, so the culture (and the author) stops using them. Its hilarious to be reading a novel with less and less letters as it goes on, and the author does a really good job of making it still understandable.
  • Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy - All of them, they will change your life. The earth is destroyed and the last ever earthling has to learn how to make it in the weird wider galaxy. That summary doesn't do it justification, though. It is fantastic and crazy. The author Douglas Adams was an absolute legend with his bizarre brand of humour, you will be quoting bits of it forever.
  • Northern Lights - Such a good trilogy. The first one at least is set in a world similar to ours, but with the difference that people have a physical manifestation of their soul called a daemon, and follows a girl Lyra on her adventure to the North. Its an adventure series that explores some really deep concepts and its just such a huge and complex universe which you will fall in love with.
  • The Prestige - If you like gothic literature like me this is a really good modern one. You might have seen the film with Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman, and its similar to the novel but more "Lets take the premise of the novel and write a different story about it". It follows a rivalry between two magicians as they seek to perfect the same trick but using different methods. It is dark as hell but really good.
  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Throwing this in because I read it recently and really enjoyed it. One of those books where you get to the end and you go "Oh damn, now I need to immediately read it again". It follows the character Eleanor who is a socially awkward British woman (maybe I see myself in her just a little...). Its occasionally cringey, but very funny and warm and an easy read.
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Gol-goroth
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Gol-goroth »

Jacob Hodgson wrote: If anyone has heard of Easton Press, highly recommend checking them out, I ordered 20000 leagues under the sea from them and the book is beautiful.
The Folio Society out of the UK also does amazing work with their printing and illustrations. I have books from both, and appreciate them both. I find Easton Press to be more consistent in their style (paper, bindings, leather covers / cases, even font) while the Folio Society makes each book more unique. The book nerd in me keeps all the easton books together in some barrister shelves so they look conforming, while the folio books are in the shelves known as the isle of misfit books.
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dunnoson
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by dunnoson »

I like the following series:
~ Burn Notice (Yes, there are some novels from the hit tv series)
~ CSI
~ Mrs. Polifax (Detective Novels from Dorothy Gilman)
~ Jack Reacher (Author: Lee Child)

I have read some classic books too, but I have so many books on my bookshelf, so if you want to know more about my books, please feel free to contact me!
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Daemon Oldman
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Daemon Oldman »

Glad I decided to explore the forums and found this thread. I read a fair bit of fantasy and sci-fi, will try to mention a few recommendations below which fellow eve "spreadsheets-in-space" geeks might enjoy:

Science Fiction or close to it...
  • Seveneves by Neal Stephenson : An incredible hard sci-fi novel in space.
  • Children of Time and Children of Ruin by Adrian Tchaikovsky : Strange alien evolution and technology ;)
  • Radicalized and Attack Surface by Cory Doctorow : Politically charged novels on tech.
  • Crystal Trilogy by Max Harms : If you think you understand exponential growth, or the possible dangers of a General AI...
  • HPMOR by Eliezer Yudkowsky : Impressive rationalist fan-fiction. It's technically fantasy, and the characterization does stretch suspension-of-disbelief, but it's fun, and the expositions on real-world maths and science (across domains) are incredible.
  • Exhalation by Ted Chiang : Breath-taking, speculative, deep, slow, and meditative...
  • Blindsight by Peter Watts : For those looking for a challenge in their next sci-fi read...
  • Eve: The Burning Life by Hjalti Danielsson : if you have to read one Eve lore novel, this should be it.
Fantasy
  • Alex Verus Series by Benedict Jacka : Urban fantasy based in London, without many of the failings of popular titles like the Dresden files. Is the ability to correctly guess the odds of future events a magical ability? Is it on-par with throwing fireballs?
  • Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss : Magical layered story-telling...
  • Bartimaeus trilogy by Jonathan Stroud : a list including modern fantasy for geeks would be incomplete without it. :)
Of course, the above list leaves out classics by Asimov (Foundation), Heinlein (Starship Troopers), Arthur C. Clarke (Fountains of Paradise), Frank Herbert (Dune) and others...

Edit P.S. : Almost forgot. Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game... The enemy's gate is down!
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Arelena Karman
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Arelena Karman »

I'm a massive Warhammer fan (geek) so I have the entire Horus Heresy series, then multiple of the 40K & Fantasy novel collections! They're worth quite a bit, but for years this was one of my main hobbies & goals to try and fill up a library basically :D

I also enjoy reading some Star Trek novels and have been working through the 'Rise of the Federation' series which is overall pretty good, has a nice continuity from the aired series!
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Katharina Broodwater
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Katharina Broodwater »

Oh yeah, Eragon by Reistopher Paoilini are brilliant books! I'd recommend Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead.
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Anidien Dallacort
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Anidien Dallacort »

Arelena Karman wrote:I'm a massive Warhammer fan (geek) so I have the entire Horus Heresy series, then multiple of the 40K & Fantasy novel collections! They're worth quite a bit, but for years this was one of my main hobbies & goals to try and fill up a library basically :D

I also enjoy reading some Star Trek novels and have been working through the 'Rise of the Federation' series which is overall pretty good, has a nice continuity from the aired series!
I read the first 15 or so Horus Heresy novels - but when it became clear they were just going to extend out the moneymaking storyline with several dozen side stories rather than progressing the central plot - I kind of fell out of it. Definitely a good series, though.
Anidien Dallacort - Teaching Officer, Mentor, Sophomore

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Daemon Oldman
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Daemon Oldman »

Zhanshi Chen wrote: 2019.09.04 05:19 Personally, I've mainly read military oriented sci-fi (which probably explains why I got into EVE), and I do have a few recommendations.

The first is Joshua Dalzelle, who wrote a series of related novels on space warfare, namely the Black Fleet Trilogy, Expansion Wars Trilogy, and an upcoming third. What's notable about this set of stories is that, for the most part, space warfare is not illustrated like the fast-paced action Star Wars, Star Trek, BSG, or yes, EVE Online depictions. Rather, its a clear "boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror" type of combat, where space battles often occur at long ranges and take place over days, constant tactical adjustment among a few instances of actual fighting.
Thanks Zhanshi for sharing this. Devoured the first 6 ebooks. Would definitely second the recommendation from a space military/ navy sci-fi perspective...
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Kirino Xar
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Re: BOOK CLUB

Post by Kirino Xar »

Hey guys,

I mainly read fantasy novels.

A few of my recommendations.

-Dresden Files
- Skulduggery Pleasant
-Monster Hunter International
-Demon Accords
-Alex Verus
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