How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

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Aisha Aureus
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How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Aisha Aureus »

Hello Everyone!

My account life is just about 28 hours when I write this post. As a new player, I understand myself very well that I still in the process to understand the basic mechanics. Therefore, I avoid PVP at all cost until I reach a certain fundamental point to be capable to do so.

8 hours ago, I was on my (devastated) Venture. When I jumped in to a portal, a ship with red skull marking suddenly attacked me, which I don't last even one second. I feel very devastated. The ship is gone now with nothing is recoverable. The last 20 hours I worked so hard to gear up my venture. I check my financial that within my account life I managed to produce more than 10 millions ISK which I have only 1.4 million left in my wallet due to the fittings.

I have some questions related to PVP:

How do people doing PVP in Eve Online? Is it only camping around a gate and killing all passing over random people? Is there is no front line where clashing powers come there to battle for a piece of territory? Why should someone having fun camping on a gate that 3 jumps away from the Tech School (A place where we can meet all the career agencies)?

What should I do as a newbie to set up my ship to (at least a bit) PVP capable?
Just dodge or tank few shots and then get away from the scene.

Thank you for your patience to read my grumbling. I feel so hesitate to go online now.
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Anidien Dallacort
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Re: How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Anidien Dallacort »

In this situation, you ventured into Low Security Space. Most kills in EVE can be seen on the website zkillboard.com, and here is the kill report that prompted this post:

https://zkillboard.com/kill/85096733/

In that kill report, you can see the system you were killed in was Frulegur, and next to it is (0.4). That is the security status of the system. Anything 0.5 to 1.0 is High Security Space. 0.1 to 0.4 is Low Security Space. 0.0 is Null Security.

You can read about security status here:

https://wiki.eveuniversity.org/Security_status

The short for this situation: in low security space, the NPC police will not respond to illegal attacks like they do in High Security. Low security space, is quite dangerous truth be told. Yes, people will sit on gates waiting for prey - especially in a system like that one.

This link to the DOTLAN map of the Metropolis system:

https://evemaps.dotlan.net/map/Metropolis#sec

Shows that particular system is bordered by two high security systems, and is a bit of a choke point for those wanting to travel to the null security region “Great Wildlands”. Chokepoints are prime points for piracy.


In EVE, the old adage is that you consent to combat when you undock, and more importantly, don’t fly what you can’t afford to lose. Even in high security space, you aren’t safe from all attacks - not only are there wars (and the Uni is in 2 now), but other mechanics which makes being shot at possible.

How to avoid unwanted PvP, is a topic that has many answers, and you will learn much as your EVE career progresses. For now, I’ll leave you with two points of advice:

1) Don’t worry about the losses. Treat each loss as a learning opportunity. Today, I hope you can take away the learning about system security, and why they were able to shoot at you in low security space like they did - what moving from high security to low security can mean. There are plenty of ways to recover those losses in terms of ISK cost, but those lessons will stick with you forever.

2) Consider joining a campus. Not only will you become acquainted with others that are learning just like you - but with a campus comes support not only in terms of a number of friendly pilots - but Intellegence (other players may report dangerous situations like the Gate Camp you came across, if they happen to come across it first), and logistics support (I.e. campus hangars might have a few ships and modules to get you back on your feet should you explode in a ball of fire).

Welcome to the University. Stick with it, it won’t be long before you look back at this first loss as an important experience in your eve career, and look back on it with a bit of fondness too. I was pretty upset when I was first blown up, but now remembering that experience only makes me smile a bit, because it makes me realize how far I’ve come in the game.
Anidien Dallacort - Teaching Officer, Mentor, Sophomore

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Gergoran Moussou
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Re: How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Gergoran Moussou »

The only way to completely avoid PVP is staying docked.

How to avoid that particular situation: You jumped into Low-Sec. There was a warning box that you had to click through to enter Low-Sec. The red skull indicates a low security status, which comes from attacking people in Low-Sec. In High-Sec, people can still shoot at you whenever they want, but NPCs show up a few seconds later to destroy the aggressor's ship (it is impossible to not be destroyed and if you find a way to avoid having your ship destroyed, you get you account banned). In Low-Sec, aggression near gates and stations gets the aggressor shot at by NPC turrets on the gate but the aggressor can warp off and avoid being destroyed. In Null-Sec, there's nothing like that but most of Null is controlled by large player coalitions which do their best to prevent anyone but them from entering into their space.

How to fit your ship: Not at all for a Venture. If you're running a mining ship, the only ones that can really be fit for any meaningful durability are Procurer and Skiff. The Venture's inherent agility and warp core stability do a lot to save it from many dangers, and it doesn't have much room to stick shield mods onto it. What you do instead is make sure that you stay aware of the situation. You had to click through a warning that you were entering an area of space where players can easily attack you without the massive punishment that occurs in High-Sec. Entrances to Low-Sec are often camped by players looking to shoot people on their way in, so if you're not comfortable bringing a ship into Low-Sec, stay out of High-Sec. It's also helpful to be aware of which routes in High-Sec have major chokepoints because those chokepoints are often popular spots for suicide ganking. What you should do is find people to fly with. For a Venture, the Amarr Mining Campus had handouts available last time I was involved there. Flying with other people gives much more than just people to talk to. There aren't many things in the game which aren't more effective with other people involved and mining is one of them. The AMC will almost always have a few people around who are flying Industrial Command Ships which can provide boosts, making a Venture's mining lasers much more effective. Most organized player groups that accept new players have services like the handout Ventures at AMC to keep people situated while they're still figuring out the basics of ISK-making. We've all been in your position at some point: just starting out, even the smallest ships are fairly expensive. Most players are glad to help new players afford what they need to get started.

For your other questions: Gatecamping is a common PVP activity, but not the only kind. Front lines for territory control are mainly out in Null-Sec. Low-Sec sort of has that with Faction Warfare, but the value of territory control dropped heavily with the introduction of player citadels since you can no longer prevent the opposing militia from docking in a system now that they can anchor their own structures to dock in even when locked out of the station. The most common types of PVP fleet (especially with E-Uni) are the kind that doesn't require much prep work, which is generally either roams (go around looking for stuff to shoot at) and gatecamps (sit on a gate waiting for people to come through, try to kill them before they get away), but other types are also very common. For example, it's not uncommon for people to go shoot at a structure owned by someone else until they do enough damage to get the reinforce timer and then return when the structure is vulnerable again to fight the defense fleet that's there to make sure that it successfully repairs itself. Most of the time, when an actual fleet fights against another actual fleet, it's something like that.

Try to see about getting your foot in with PVP as well. I know that Fweddit (Low-Sec corp that has some good PVPers) runs a public new-player roaming fleet that forms up at E-Uni's High-Sec Campus every Monday.
Former E-Uni FC (LSC/WHC).

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Aisha Aureus
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Re: How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Aisha Aureus »

Anidien Dallacort wrote:In this situation, you ventured into Low Security Space. Most kills in EVE can be seen on the website zkillboard.com, and here is the kill report that prompted this post:

https://zkillboard.com/kill/85096733/

In that kill report, you can see the system you were killed in was Frulegur, and next to it is (0.4). That is the security status of the system. Anything 0.5 to 1.0 is High Security Space. 0.1 to 0.4 is Low Security Space. 0.0 is Null Security.

You can read about security status here:

https://wiki.eveuniversity.org/Security_status

The short for this situation: in low security space, the NPC police will not respond to illegal attacks like they do in High Security. Low security space, is quite dangerous truth be told. Yes, people will sit on gates waiting for prey - especially in a system like that one.

This link to the DOTLAN map of the Metropolis system:

https://evemaps.dotlan.net/map/Metropolis#sec

Shows that particular system is bordered by two high security systems, and is a bit of a choke point for those wanting to travel to the null security region “Great Wildlands”. Chokepoints are prime points for piracy.
Hi Anidien Dallacort!

Thank you for the comprehensive information! Now I learned something from this incident. I will go through all articles you provide to further learning. Thank you so much.


Anidien Dallacort wrote:In EVE, the old adage is that you consent to combat when you undock, and more importantly, don’t fly what you can’t afford to lose. Even in high security space, you aren’t safe from all attacks - not only are there wars (and the Uni is in 2 now), but other mechanics which makes being shot at possible.

How to avoid unwanted PvP, is a topic that has many answers, and you will learn much as your EVE career progresses. For now, I’ll leave you with two points of advice:

1) Don’t worry about the losses. Treat each loss as a learning opportunity. Today, I hope you can take away the learning about system security, and why they were able to shoot at you in low security space like they did - what moving from high security to low security can mean. There are plenty of ways to recover those losses in terms of ISK cost, but those lessons will stick with you forever.

2) Consider joining a campus. Not only will you become acquainted with others that are learning just like you - but with a campus comes support not only in terms of a number of friendly pilots - but Intellegence (other players may report dangerous situations like the Gate Camp you came across, if they happen to come across it first), and logistics support (I.e. campus hangars might have a few ships and modules to get you back on your feet should you explode in a ball of fire).
1. Yes ma'am! Your instruction is well received.
2. I want to. I've read this article: https://wiki.eveuniversity.org/Campuses. However, I am not sure which campus I should join, there are so many terms that I don't understand the meaning. It will take some times to understand the idea and then I will absolutely join one.

Anidien Dallacort wrote:Welcome to the University. Stick with it, it won’t be long before you look back at this first loss as an important experience in your eve career, and look back on it with a bit of fondness too. I was pretty upset when I was first blown up, but now remembering that experience only makes me smile a bit, because it makes me realize how far I’ve come in the game.
Thank you. :D :D :D
It just being less than a week I join to this game. It is amazing, I never find such great and friendly community like this in other games before.

Gergoran Moussou wrote:The only way to completely avoid PVP is staying docked.

How to avoid that particular situation: You jumped into Low-Sec. There was a warning box that you had to click through to enter Low-Sec. The red skull indicates a low security status, which comes from attacking people in Low-Sec. In High-Sec, people can still shoot at you whenever they want, but NPCs show up a few seconds later to destroy the aggressor's ship (it is impossible to not be destroyed and if you find a way to avoid having your ship destroyed, you get you account banned). In Low-Sec, aggression near gates and stations gets the aggressor shot at by NPC turrets on the gate but the aggressor can warp off and avoid being destroyed. In Null-Sec, there's nothing like that but most of Null is controlled by large player coalitions which do their best to prevent anyone but them from entering into their space.
Yes sir..!! I've learned my lesson now. :D

Gergoran Moussou wrote:How to fit your ship: Not at all for a Venture. If you're running a mining ship, the only ones that can really be fit for any meaningful durability are Procurer and Skiff. The Venture's inherent agility and warp core stability do a lot to save it from many dangers, and it doesn't have much room to stick shield mods onto it. What you do instead is make sure that you stay aware of the situation. You had to click through a warning that you were entering an area of space where players can easily attack you without the massive punishment that occurs in High-Sec. Entrances to Low-Sec are often camped by players looking to shoot people on their way in, so if you're not comfortable bringing a ship into Low-Sec, stay out of High-Sec. It's also helpful to be aware of which routes in High-Sec have major chokepoints because those chokepoints are often popular spots for suicide ganking. What you should do is find people to fly with. For a Venture, the Amarr Mining Campus had handouts available last time I was involved there. Flying with other people gives much more than just people to talk to. There aren't many things in the game which aren't more effective with other people involved and mining is one of them. The AMC will almost always have a few people around who are flying Industrial Command Ships which can provide boosts, making a Venture's mining lasers much more effective. Most organized player groups that accept new players have services like the handout Ventures at AMC to keep people situated while they're still figuring out the basics of ISK-making. We've all been in your position at some point: just starting out, even the smallest ships are fairly expensive. Most players are glad to help new players afford what they need to get started.

I got you well... It is me who must adapt with the situation, not forcing my ship to cope with a task that it is not made for. Lol. :lol:
I am considering to buy a Slasher for my basic fundamental in PVP experience.
Thank you for all your support. These knowledge means so much for me.

Gergoran Moussou wrote:For your other questions: Gatecamping is a common PVP activity, but not the only kind. Front lines for territory control are mainly out in Null-Sec. Low-Sec sort of has that with Faction Warfare, but the value of territory control dropped heavily with the introduction of player citadels since you can no longer prevent the opposing militia from docking in a system now that they can anchor their own structures to dock in even when locked out of the station. The most common types of PVP fleet (especially with E-Uni) are the kind that doesn't require much prep work, which is generally either roams (go around looking for stuff to shoot at) and gatecamps (sit on a gate waiting for people to come through, try to kill them before they get away), but other types are also very common. For example, it's not uncommon for people to go shoot at a structure owned by someone else until they do enough damage to get the reinforce timer and then return when the structure is vulnerable again to fight the defense fleet that's there to make sure that it successfully repairs itself. Most of the time, when an actual fleet fights against another actual fleet, it's something like that.
Yes, I also learned about the security levels now. Actually gate camping is not something new for me. I had the same long time ago in Rising Force Online. However, in that game deaths will not impact you any losses penalty other than warped back to the spawn point. I felt so upset when I ask people around there and all gave me answer that I lost everything I carried with me, include the ship. The only thing what will fly back to the spawn point is the pilot in the capsule, and that's not even accurate to the real situation. The real situation is the pilot was also killed in the capsule. It is a fresh new clone with consciousness + data transferred to it. Thank you for the knowledge sharing. I really appreciate that.

Gergoran Moussou wrote:Try to see about getting your foot in with PVP as well. I know that Fweddit (Low-Sec corp that has some good PVPers) runs a public new-player roaming fleet that forms up at E-Uni's High-Sec Campus every Monday.
Roger wilco! Will proceed as your instruction.
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Anidien Dallacort
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Re: How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Anidien Dallacort »

Eve Uni members can join as many campuses as they wish. You can come and go as you please. Don’t be afraid about making the “wrong” choice.

Feel free to join into the campus chat channels, hop on mumble and join campus chats, etc. visit the various locations, join in on the fun. The goal is to find a group of people who enjoy doing what you enjoy, so you can do it all together.
Anidien Dallacort - Teaching Officer, Mentor, Sophomore

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Christoph Patrouette
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Re: How to Avoid PVP for a Newbie?

Post by Christoph Patrouette »

Aisha Aureus wrote:The only thing what will fly back to the spawn point is the pilot in the capsule, and that's not even accurate to the real situation. The real situation is the pilot was also killed in the capsule. It is a fresh new clone with consciousness + data transferred to it.
That distinction is actually very important. Most people will plug items called implants into their clones body. They improve various attributes, ranging from quicker skill training time to ship performance or industry efficiency. I would recommend getting some cheap training implants as soon as possible, the Uni is actually providing a discount service for them.

Just note that - as you already correctly wrote - if you lose your pod, you will lose the implants. Thats where jumpclones come in handy, which is another reason to join a campus as you will have access to multiple (mostly free) clonebays to store your expensive clones in.
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