Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

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Ambar Khardula (Biomassed 2016.10.28)

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Post 2014.10.19 20:38

Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

Hi, I've been looking at all things to do with ship fittings lately and I'm curious as to what the STABLE in the top right of the fitting window means. Does it mean that the current fitting is most ideal? Why do most fittings I find on the UniWiki not show the stable but instead shows the read text? Any information will help.

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Rashar Arji

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Post 2014.10.19 20:41

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

It means that your capacitor will never run out. It should also show a % which indicates at which level your capacitor is stable, since peak recharge rate occurs at 25% the closer to 25% of your total capacitor you are the more stable your will be. If it says unstable it shows a time in the HH:MM:SS format which indicates the time it takes to deplete your capacitor.

EDIT: It basically boils down to cap related skills; Capacitor Management, Capacitor Operation, Controlled Bursts(for guns that uses cap) and any other skills that affect module cap drain.
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Ambar Khardula (Biomassed 2016.10.28)

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Post 2014.10.19 21:05

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

Thanks so much! That makes sense to me. I didn't know what the HH:MM:SS time stamp meant.
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Wilhelm Knicklicht

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Post 2014.10.20 05:02

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

you may want to keep it in mind that the value shows capacitor stability with all active modules running. this can be misleading. for example, you will often use a micro warp drive only briefly to get near a target, then switch it off. this will considerably extend your cap life and probably even allow it to recharge.

also, cap stability is not always relevant. for example, a pvp fight in t1 frigates rarely lasts longer than a minute. so if your fitting window shows you that you will run out of cap in 2:30 mins, that's perfectly fine.

when you fit a ship for missioning, on the other hand, you should aim for a long cap life or even cap stability, as some missions may take a long time to complete.

3rd party fitting apps like PYFA or EFT let you activate and deactivate modules in your fit, giving you more of a "real-life" (no pun intended) value for your capacitor life.
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Daniel Wittaker

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Post 2014.10.20 09:06

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

Wilhelm Knicklicht wrote:when you fit a ship for missioning, on the other hand, you should aim for a long cap life or even cap stability, as some missions may take a long time to complete.


Other than that, your post was alright. Some hulls will lend themselves to cap stability (Tengu, anything with a passive shield fit), but most of the time you'll gain a lot more by having enough cap and tank to get by, and then working on things like damage, tracking, and mobility.

The correct answer to "How much cap do I need?"--which you brushed on--is, in all situations, "enough".
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Jem Aideron

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Post 2015.08.09 03:43

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

That little notice at the top right is actually one of the most important things in the whole game. You can't afford to gloss over it lightly; if there were one thing about ships that all players should master, it would be that, in my opinion. A single forum post cannot do the topic justice. If I were you I'd read the wiki on Capacitor Management 101 and listen to previous class recordings (and if any teachers are reading, I'd love for someone to teach this class!).

Basically, STABLE means you can run all your modules that you have fitted indefinitely and your ship will never run out of power. Any time given in red is the time you can run all of your modules before your ship runs out of power, at which point all active modules (including weapons!) will shut off. The device that stores the power for modules in your ship is called a "capacitor", so people will talk about being "cap stable". While it is obviously ideal to be cap stable, it is not necessarily a bad thing not to be stable (sometimes it's impossible); it depends on the context. For PvP battles, most of which last 1-2 minutes max, you're generally good as long as you have that much time. For missions where you are fighting NPCs, the battles typically last longer, so you'd ideally want 4-5 minutes of cap.

Also bear in mind that the time given in red is for when all of your modules are running at once. If you need to use only one in a certain situation, and one in another that won't usually overlap with the former, then that number is misleading. To find out how long your cap will last with only a subset of your modules running at once, just click the power button next to the modules you don't want to include in the fitting window to temporarily turn them off, and the cap time in the upper right will adjust to reflect only those modules that are powered-on.
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Wotan Mjolnir

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Post 2015.08.09 12:40

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

Being cap stable is not the be-all and end-all - as Wittaker said, quite rightly, the amount of cap you need is 'enough' - striving for cap stability can reduce your effectiveness in other aspects of the game, which is just daft. Basically, if you have enough cap without needing to add mods to make your hull stable you can use those slots for something more useful - tank, an extra web - which could make your mission go faster or tip the fight more in your favour, which in itself could reduce the amount of cap you need.
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Daniel Wittaker

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Post 2015.08.09 15:19

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

Wotan Mjolnir wrote:Being cap stable is not the be-all and end-all - as Wittaker said, quite rightly, the amount of cap you need is 'enough' - striving for cap stability can reduce your effectiveness in other aspects of the game, which is just daft. Basically, if you have enough cap without needing to add mods to make your hull stable you can use those slots for something more useful - tank, an extra web - which could make your mission go faster or tip the fight more in your favour, which in itself could reduce the amount of cap you need.


This is correct. Especially the part about me being correct.

Jem Aideron wrote:Basically, STABLE means you can run all your modules that you have fitted indefinitely and your ship will never run out of power.


The thing is, you don't really need to run everything at once in most situations. You sort of come around to this in paragraph three, but you're overestimating how many modules you typically need to run, and underestimating just how much player skill in managing cap can stretch that number. I've had 4-5 minute fights in fits with barely a minute's worth of cap--with just two active modules. Perma-running a point and careful MWD pulsing did that.

Jem Aideron wrote:While it is obviously ideal to be cap stable, it is not necessarily a bad thing not to be stable


Other way around. Cap instability should be treated as the desirable norm. As Wotan mentions, it means you're using all of your slots to maximum effectiveness. And slots are really your fit's most important currency.

Cap stability is a compromise you make with a specific reason in mind. A cap-stable Logi, for instance, is designed to maintain maximum rep output. It makes it easy for a relatively inexperienced or unskilled player to fly, and it's immune to pressure. You can't lower its rep output by chasing or shooting it.A cap-unstable version of the same fit, on the other hand, is a little trickier to fly, and can be pressured, but the trade-off is that it can rep a little harder (in bursts), or move quicker, or tank harder, or lock faster.

Jem Aideron wrote:For missions where you are fighting NPCs, the battles typically last longer, so you'd ideally want 4-5 minutes of cap.


It depends on your applied DPS relative to the EHP and tank on the field. A ship with a large amount of DPS, that can apply it easily, doesn't need very much cap. Two minutes on a Nightmare or a Mach in an L4 is a lot of cap, because in two minutes, you'll have dramatically reduced the amount of incoming damage.

Other forms of PvP favor cap stability, because the incoming DPS is too large to buffer against and your damage output is tiny compared to the EHP of the NPC masses on the field. Nullsec DED sites are like that.

And still other times, it's a matter of pure convenience. Shield-tanked ratting carriers, for instance, are usually designed with extremely undersized shield boosters, high resists, and are "cap-stable at jump cap". What this means is that you can warp one into a site, deploy drones and activate modules, and then simply leave it alone. When threatened, you can then jump out to a safe cyno in less time than a subcap can align and warp.
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Jem Aideron

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Post 2015.08.09 17:13

Re: Stable Ship Fittings [QUESTION]

"Ideal" was the wrong word, I admit. I was more aiming at, "if you happen to get it serendipitously, it's a nice bonus". I well understand your point: you don't try to fit your ship to be cap stable, you fit your ship to be the best at what you want to use it for. It's important to know what modules will be active when because, as you've rightly stressed, they are most likely not all going to be used simultaneously and so you can't go off of the red number in the fitting window when all modules are on, but check the different subsets of modules you are likely to use at the same time for extended periods.
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